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Contact: Rosemary W. Stevens
Ace Public Relations
(650) 494-2800
chi2009media@gmail.com

For Immediate Release:

ACM Conference on Computer-Human Interaction to Address Designing for Global Impact of Mobile Devices

Nokia Research’s Chipchase Examines Cultural Dimension of Interaction Design

BOSTON, MA (March 24, 2009) -– A top researcher for Nokia Design will address the need for effective cross-culture design research when developing informed and inspired designs for future mobile technologies. Jan Chipchase, who studies how people around the world behave, communicate, and interact with each other, is an invited speaker at ACM’s Computer-Human Interaction 2009 (CHI 2009) conference on April 6, at Boston’s Hynes Convention Center.

Chipchase notes that understanding both the similarities and differences between cultures often helps shape future ideas for mobile device development. “That is why my research focus is on detecting early signals of new trends within a culture and combining that knowledge with the understanding of where technology is heading,” he explains. Chipchase splits his time between running user studies and developing new applications, services and products that people are likely to be using 3 to 15 years from now.

CHI 2009 Design Chair Robert Fabricant noted that Chipchase was invited to address the cultural dimensions of interaction design because understanding the individual cultural impact of global technologies is essential for successful devices. “He has deep knowledge and experience observing world cultures and synthesizing his observations into key concepts a designer can apply when developing future technologies,” said Fabricant, who is Executive Creativity Director at frog design, inc.

The annual conference on Computer-Human Interaction (www.chi2009.org) is the premier worldwide forum for exchanging information on all aspects of how people interact with computers. CHI 2009 runs from April 4-9, at the Hynes Convention Center. It offers two days of pre-conference workshops and four days of dynamic sessions that explore the future of computer-human interaction with researchers, practitioners, educators and students.

More than 2000 professionals from over 40 countries are expected at this year's conference, which marks 27 years of research, innovation and development of the Computer-Human Interaction community. CHI 2009 is sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Human Interaction (SIGCHI). Organizations contributing to the financial support of the conference include Autodesk, Inc.; Google, Inc.; Microsoft Corp.; Nokia Research Center; and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

About ACM

ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery (www.acm.org), is the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession’s collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking.